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sweatyfox
16th September 2004, 04:28 PM
Hi people

I need to free up some space on both my C and D drives (both are internal!). In particular I would like to be able to copy some of the videos andmusic I have on my computer.
onto a CD/DVD.

So anyway I have a Sony VAIO laptop from 2001 and it has a DVD ROM drive. I was wondering which program/programs I should use to copy mpegs to disk either on a CD or DVD (can I do this with WMVs/Real Media files as well?). The same goes for MP3s and Audio files. Finally. I might even like to try to copy some of the JPG pictures onto a disc too.

The next question therefore if this can be done, is what should I buy to copy onto for these different formats (video/pictures/music). CD-R/DVD-R etc.

Thanks for any help, the pics I can just put on floppy disc but I'd much prefer to store more of them on a proper disc.

I seem to have Open MG Jukebox and Roxio on my computer but Real Media player doesn't recognise that I have a burning device on it.

SF

Quartz
16th September 2004, 06:04 PM
You can store any kind of data on a DVD (just treat it as a data disc). You will need a DVD writer, of course (external models using a USB cable are also available, so you should be able to plug it right in to your laptop if it has USB (2.0)). A DVD-ROM is read-only. Most DVD writers are bundled with burning software, like Nero (hasn't failed me yet). In these programs, you can choose the type of data you want to burn. In your case (simple excess data storage), you just choose data. The most common type of DVD disc is DVD+R (write once) or DVD+RW (re-writable, more expensive). I think the DVD+ standard is the most widely accepteded nowadays. I'm currently using an internal Lite-On DVD+RW writer (only about 95 US$) and Imation 8-speed DVD+R disks (about 2 US$ a piece).

By the way: DVD writers can read and burn CDs as well, so if you have smaller amounts of data you want to keep together on a separate disk (like a 500 MB JPEG collection), you can burn it on a separate 700 MB CD without wasting a 4.7 GB DVD on it.

Yealith
16th September 2004, 07:37 PM
Hi SF
I use an external USB harddisk to backup all my data as well as for some extra storage.
For example:
http://www.pixmania.com/fi/uk/44181/art/freecom/external-claissic-hard-di.html
http://www.dabs.com/uk/channels/components/Productview.htm?quicklinx=33RZ

Quartz
16th September 2004, 08:36 PM
Yes, plugging in an extra harddisk is also an option, but it tends to fill up after a while as well (First Law of Harddisks: any amount of disk space will not be enough sooner or later). However, if you are certain that you want to keep (and from time to time view/use, but not delete) the data you want to remove from your primary harddisk, storage media like DVDs may prove more economical in the long run. If you have a lot of data of a 'watch/use a few times, until I've seen/used it enough' nature, faster storage media like external harddisks may be more logical. So, the question you have to answer is simple: do I want to hang on to these data forever (use DVDs and CDs), or do I want to move them out of the way from time to time until I don't need them any longer (use an extra disk drive)?

Quartz
20th September 2004, 06:02 PM
SF, did this get you anywhere or do you have additional questions?

Quartz
20th September 2004, 06:07 PM
By the way: DVD writers can read and burn CDs as well, so if you have smaller amounts of data you want to keep together on a separate disk (like a 500 MB JPEG collection), you can burn it on a separate 700 MB CD without wasting a 4.7 GB DVD on it.

Additional note: there's always the possibility to burn a multisession DVD, so you can burn 700 MB on it on the first day, an additional 1.2 GB the next day, and so on .. until it's full. So you don't have to save up to 4.7 GB of data to start burning a DVD, you can fill it up in several sessions until it's full. The downside is that it will cost you some DVD diskspace, because storing the multisession data involves some overhead.

sweatyfox
20th September 2004, 06:21 PM
Hi Quartz and everyone who has made suggestions here,

Cheers for the info. I just really need to get some of this stuff off my computer. I got a whole load of MP3s when a friend came down, plus there's my video and pics collections including many from AW.com of course. And then the antivirus progs etc keep updating, taking more memory up. I installed Spybot etc to stop browser hijacks. Eventually my C and D drives have just filled up. My laptop now is running at dangerously low memory levels.

So I just needed suggestions as to how to take some of these JPEGS/MP3s/MPEGS etc off my laptop onto a CD/DVD which can hold lots of them at a time. I have floppy discs, but at 1.48 MB a time they can't hold anything substantial and even to save JPEGS on them, I'd use up an entire box.

So it looks from what you say like I have to buy an external drive which can burn CDs and write to DVD discs. I did consider the external hard drive but that really postpones the problem rather than dealing with it, though I do have quite a bit of stuff I probably will end up deleting anyway. So it was really a question of something which doesn't cost too much and also knowing what kinds of CD/DVD to buy to make sure they are compatible.

One last thing, I think I tried to copy a few MPEGS/WMV before but was told the file couldn't be copied. Has anyone found this for AW.com vids or Sapphicerotica (of which I was also once a member)?

Can I just assure you at this juncture it is simply a matter of freeing space on my comp and yet being able to keep these great vids etc for future reference. I am not about to start a mass piracy operation or anything, Abby and co should know by now I would not infringe upon her rights or try to damage the site in any other way by copying and selling discs.

SF

Quartz
20th September 2004, 06:48 PM
There is no copy protection on these files. Maybe some other program was still using the file(s), or the destination disk was full. There is no mechanism in place to prevent copying of media files from sources like AW and SE (or any other that I'm aware of); I don't even think it's possible, except on copyrighted storage media (commercial DVD releases) or with DRM stuff.

Note on DVD burning: for it to work fast and without errors, you will first need to free up 4.7 GB of disk space to allow the burning software to create a DVD image on your harddisk before actually burning it to DVD. I believe it's possible to work without it (never had to try that), but it may slow things down or even abort the burning process (after which you can toss the DVD ..).

As for the hardware: I can recommend Plextor (http://www.plextor.com/english/products/products.html) and Lite-On (http://www.liteonit.com/) in the 'not overly expensive' department. This stuff should be available from most major UK hardware/PC outlets and websites.

Quartz
20th September 2004, 07:09 PM
Abby and co should know by now I would not infringe upon her rights or try to damage the site in any other way by copying and selling discs.

I think Abby & Co. would be rather disappointed to see you erase their stuff to preserve diskspace, and not burn it to DVD ...

pjay
21st September 2004, 11:33 PM
There is no copy protection on these files. Maybe some other program was still using the file(s), or the destination disk was full. There is no mechanism in place to prevent copying of media files from sources like AW and SE (or any other that I'm aware of); I don't even think it's possible, except on copyrighted storage media (commercial DVD releases) or with DRM stuff.
DRM?? Can we have a gloss please?

There is some downloadable stuff that is (sort of) copy-controlled, but not in the sense - AFAIK - that the files can't be copy, but in that they are time limited. Currently, one can 'rent' videos from a number of the big US adult video sellers by downloading a file for a fixed fee. The file can be viewed multiple times but only for so many days. I experimented with this a year or so ago. Pic quality was pretty decent. Sadly, relatively few titles seem to be available (it looks like only a handful of distributors are making their material available in this way currently). I happened to cast an eye over the stock at jadedvideo.com a few weeks ago and there is still only a fairly small stock (a few hundred). I had thought the market might of mushroomed in the last year, but it seems not. (Peculiar as porn tends to push the envelope when it comes to new methods of publishing).

sweatyfox
22nd September 2004, 12:23 AM
I think that's part of what I meant Pjay, yep. I mean I would have thought some kind of encryption to prevent copying was certainly possible. But I think most of the stuff I have downloaded was meant to be kept.

Quartz, I would hope you are right and that Abby would see it as a compliment that I would actually think of her work as quality enough to want to keep safely on a disc for future enjoyment.

SF

Quartz
22nd September 2004, 01:19 AM
DRM?? Can we have a gloss please?


Digital Rights Management (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22digital+rights+management), basically a way of ensuring that copyrighted content can only be played by those who have paid for it. For example, Windows Media Player is DRM-capable, so it may refuse to play copyrighted material if you can't prove that you have a right to play it. This is not usually applicable to porn clips. Think Disney, Sony, Time-Warner and such.

Luxman
22nd September 2004, 07:24 AM
Think Disney, Sony, Time-Warner and such.
Porn clips from Disney?

Yeah, I wanna see Micky, Minnie, Donald & Daisy in a hot gang bang shoot. ;)

Lxm

bubbatech
23rd September 2004, 08:31 AM
Iomega is soon to come out with a Cartridge system again, 37 GB cap?

this may suit your backup needs or you could go with dvd, But I prefer a cardridge, and that helps protect the data better IMO

pjay
24th September 2004, 01:10 AM
Digital Rights Management (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22digital+rights+management), basically a way of ensuring that copyrighted content can only be played by those who have paid for it. For example, Windows Media Player is DRM-capable, so it may refuse to play copyrighted material if you can't prove that you have a right to play it. This is not usually applicable to porn clips. Think Disney, Sony, Time-Warner and such.
Doh! Should have been able to work that one out...

I guess I see enough acronyms in my work-environment (I am a small cog in the wheels of state administration) to not want to have to put too much thought into them when at home.